About Harris County MUD 364

This author has not yet filled in any details.
So far Harris County MUD 364 has created 9 blog entries.

Hurricane Preparedness 2022

Be ready for hurricane season. Today you can determine your personal hurricane risk, find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone, and review/update insurance policies. You can also make a list of items to replenish hurricane emergency supplies and start thinking about how you will prepare your home for the coming hurricane season. If you live in hurricane-prone areas, you are encouraged to complete these simple preparations before hurricane season begins on June 1.


Find out today what types of wind and water hazards could happen where you live, and then start preparing how to handle them. Hurricanes are not just a coastal problem. impacts from wind and water can be felt hundreds of miles inland, and significant impacts can occur regardless of the storm’s strength. Know if you live in an area prone to flooding and if you’re safe to remain in your home.


Find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone. You may also need to leave if you live in a flood prone area or in a mobile home outside a hurricane evacuation zone. Now is the time to begin planning where you would go and how you would get there.

You do not need to travel hundreds of miles. Your destination could be a friend or relative who lives in a well built home outside flood prone areas. Remember, your safest place may be to remain home. Be sure to account for your pets in your plan.

As hurricane season approaches, listen to local officials on questions related to how you may need to adjust any evacuation plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


Whether you’re evacuating or sheltering-in-place, you’re going to need supplies not just to get through the storm but for the potentially lengthy and unpleasant aftermath. Have enough non-perishable food, water and medicine to last each person in your family a minimum of 3 days (store a longer than 3-day supply of water, if possible). Electricity and water could be out for at least that long. You’ll need extra cash, a battery-powered radio and flashlights. You may need a portable crank or solar-powered USB charger for your cell phones.

If you need to go to a public shelter, follow health guidelines from your local officials and the CDC.


Call your insurance company or agent and ask for an insurance check-up to make sure you have enough insurance to repair or even replace your home and/or belongings. Remember, home and renters insurance doesn’t cover flooding, so you’ll need a separate policy for it.

Flood insurance is available through your company, agent, or the National Flood Insurance Program at floodsmart.gov. Act now, as flood insurance requires a 30-day waiting period.


Whether you’re evacuating, or planning to ride out the storm in your home, make sure it is in good repair and up to local hurricane building code specifications to withstand wind impacts. Many retrofits are not as costly or time consuming as you may think.

Have the proper plywood, steel or aluminum panels to board up the windows and doors. Remember, the garage door is the most vulnerable part of the home, so it must be able to withstand the winds.

If you’re a renter, work with your landlord now to prepare your home for a storm.


Many people rely on their neighbors before and after a disaster, and there are many ways you can help them. Learn about all the different actions you and your neighbors can take to prepare and recover from the hazards associated with hurricanes.

Start the conversation now with these Neighbor Helping Neighbor strategies but remember you may need to adjust your preparedness plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


The time to prepare for a hurricane is before the season begins, when you have the time and are not under pressure. If you wait until a hurricane is on your doorstep, the odds are that you will be under duress and will make the wrong decisions.

Take the time now to write down your hurricane plan. Know who issues evacuation orders for your area, determine locations on where you will ride out the storm, and start to get your supplies now. Being prepared before a hurricane threatens makes you resilient to the hurricane impacts of wind and water. It will mean the difference between being a hurricane victim or a hurricane survivor.

By |2022-05-12T17:44:42-05:00May 12th, 2022|Latest News|

Water Conservation

Water Conservation

Astronomers don’t know the answer to the question, “Is there life on other planets?” However, when searching for the possibility, one of the criteria is whether there are signs of water. Water is essential to life and we are surrounded by it, as it makes up 70 percent of our planet. Yet less than 1 percent of that water – all the water from our lakes, streams, and rivers – is fresh. And without it, we would cease to exist.

Research studies indicate that during the summer months 50% to 60% of our water consumption is for lawn irrigation and applied to the landscape, and 30% to 40% of the water used for lawn irrigation was being wasted by overwatering of lawns.

The Water Smart program seeks to encourage each of us to learn about water conservation and have a personal responsibility to use water wisely. Here are some simple ways to save water:

Inside the Home
  • Wash only full loads of clothes and dishes.
  • Turn Off The Tap
    • Don’t let water run while shaving or washing your face.
    • Just by turning off the tap while you brush your teeth in the morning and before bedtime, you can save up to 8 gallons of water! That adds up to more than 200 gallons a month, enough to fill a huge fish tank that holds 6 small sharks!
  • Fix That Leak
    • Check faucets, spigots, and pipes for leaks and drips. A faucet that drips only once per second can waste up to 2,700 gallons of water per year!
    • Fix that leak- Fixing a toilet leak is a great way to reduce household water use and boost water conservation. If your toilet has a leak, you could be wasting about 200 gallons of water every day. That would be like flushing your toilet more than 50 times for no reason!
Outside the Home
  • Comply with designated watering restrictions if nay are in effect.
  • Irrigation efficiency is a key component in water management / focus on doing more with less.
  • Adjust your lawn and landscape irrigation systems to water either in the early morning or late afternoon. If you water mid-day, much of the water is lost to evaporation.
  • Inspect sprinkler systems often for broken sprinkler heads and leaks.
  • Watering lawns and plants too much and too frequently results in shallow roots, weed growth and plant disease. Consider using native plants and landscape designs that require less irrigation water use to maintain.
  • Mulch, Mulch, Mulch! A thick layer (3 inches or more) of coarse mulch acts as insulation for the soil in your flower beds and significantly reduces evaporation.
By |2022-05-10T12:13:34-05:00May 10th, 2022|Latest News|

Hurricane Preparedness 2021

Be ready for hurricane season. Today you can determine your personal hurricane risk, find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone, and review/update insurance policies. You can also make a list of items to replenish hurricane emergency supplies and start thinking about how you will prepare your home for the coming hurricane season. If you live in hurricane-prone areas, you are encouraged to complete these simple preparations before hurricane season begins on June 1.  Keep in mind, you may need to adjust any preparedness actions based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


Find out today what types of wind and water hazards could happen where you live, and then start preparing how to handle them. Hurricanes are not just a coastal problem. Their impacts can be felt hundreds of miles inland, and significant impacts can occur without it being a major hurricane.


The first thing you need to do is find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone.  If you do, now is the time to begin planning where you would go and how you would get there. You do not need to travel hundreds of miles, but have multiple options. Your destination could be a friend or relative who doesn’t live in an evacuation zone.  If you live in a well-built home outside the evacuation zone, your safest place may be to remain home.  Be sure to account for your pets in your plan.  As hurricane season approaches, listen to local officials on questions related to how you may need to adjust any evacuation plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


You’re going to need supplies not just to get through the storm but for the potentially lengthy and unpleasant aftermath. Have enough non-perishable food, water and medicine to last each person in your family a minimum of three days. Electricity and water could be out for at least that long. You’ll need extra cash, a battery-powered radio and flashlights. You may need a portable crank or solar-powered USB charger for your cell phones.

If you need to go to a public shelter, the CDC recommends bringing items that can help protect you and others from COVID-19, such as hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, bar or liquid soap, disinfectant wipes (if available) and two masks for each person. (Children under two years old and people having trouble breathing should not wear face coverings.)


Call your insurance company or agent and ask for an insurance check-up to make sure you have enough homeowners insurance to repair or even replace your home. Don’t forget coverage for your car or boat. Remember, standard homeowners insurance doesn’t cover flooding. Whether you’re a homeowner or renter, you’ll need a separate policy for it, and it’s available through your company, agent or the National Flood Insurance Program at floodsmart.gov. Act now as flood insurance requires a 30-day waiting period.


If you plan to ride out the storm in your home, make sure it is in good repair and up to local hurricane building code specifications. Many retrofits are not as costly or time consuming as you may think. Have the proper plywood, steel or aluminum panels to board up the windows and doors. Remember, the garage door is the most vulnerable part of the home, so it must be able to withstand the winds.


Many Americans rely on their neighbors after a disaster, but there are also many ways you can help your neighbors before a hurricane approaches. Learn about all the different actions you and your neighbors can take to prepare and recover from the hazards associated with hurricanes. Start the conversation now with these Neighbor Helping Neighbor strategies but remember you may need to adjust your preparedness plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


The time to prepare for a hurricane is before the season begins, when you have the time and are not under pressure. If you wait until a hurricane is on your doorstep, the odds are that you will be under duress and will make the wrong decisions. Take the time now to write down your hurricane plan. Know who issues evacuation orders for your area, determine locations on where you will ride out the storm, and start to get your supplies now.  Being prepared before a hurricane threatens makes you resilient to the hurricane impacts of wind and water. It will mean the difference between being a hurricane victim or a hurricane survivor.

By |2021-11-30T13:08:05-06:00May 1st, 2021|Archive|

February 2021 Freeze Event Leak Adjustment Credits

Harris County Municipal Utility District No. 364 (the “District”) has adopted a Resolution Adopting Policy and Procedures for February 2021 Freeze Event Leak Adjustment Credits (the “Resolution”) under which the District will consider permitting a credit because of loss of water due to rupture or other damage causing a leak in a customer’s water line(s) due to the winter storm and freeze event of February 2021 (the “Freeze Event”). Credit may be given for water usage and sewer usage in excess of the customer’s average usage, as determined by the District pursuant to the Resolution (the “Freeze Event Leak Adjustment Credit”). The Freeze Event Leak Adjustment Credit is limited to the billing cycle(s) containing the days included in the Freeze Event (the “Applicable Billing Cycle(s)”) and must be requested by May 19, 2021.

Policy & Procedures (PDF)
Application (PDF)

By |2021-05-22T08:01:38-05:00April 29th, 2021|Archive|

Water Boil Notice Lifted- 2/19/2021 @ 5:00 p.m.

On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, Harris County MUD No. 364 issued a Boil Water Notice to inform customers, individuals, or employees that due to the extreme weather events and conditions which occurred recently in the public water system, the water from this public water system was required to be boiled prior to use for drinking water or human consumption purposes.

HCMUD No. 364 has taken the necessary corrective actions to restore the quality of the water distributed by this public water system used for drinking water or human consumption purposes and has provided TCEQ with laboratory test results that indicate that the water no longer requires boiling prior to use as of February 19, 2021.

If you have questions concerning this matter, you may contact the District’s Operator.

By |2021-02-19T17:05:50-06:00February 19th, 2021|Latest News|

Water Boil Notice

Due to inclement weather conditions the following district will be under Boil Water notice until further notice: Harris County MUD 364.

To ensure destruction of all harmful bacteria and other microbes, water for drinking, cooking, and making ice should be boiled and cooled prior to use. The water should be brought to a vigorous, rolling boil and then boiled for two minutes. In lieu of boiling, you may purchase bottled water or obtain water from some other suitable source.

When it is no longer necessary to boil the water, the water system officials will notify you that the water is safe for consumption. Instructions to discontinue boiling will be issued in the same manner as this notice.

If you have questions concerning this matter, you may contact our office at (281) 367-5511.

By |2021-02-23T15:06:55-06:00February 17th, 2021|Archive|
Go to Top